Studio 10

Scotte Meredith spomacguy at gmail.com
Thu Feb 28 11:32:59 EST 2019


I brought up the editor in Studio 10 beta 3 (haven’t installed final version yet).

Once you have the command selected, in the lower left (next to the 2 arrow icons) is an icon to “open edit helper dialog”. It only shows for commands that have it available. It brings up a somewhat familiar dialog box.

In the beta it is available for the Working message, but not the OK message. I don’t know if OK message has been added to the final version.



> On Feb 28, 2019, at 7:47 AM, Thad Bogert <thad at technosolver.com> wrote:
> 
> Hey Scotte,
> 
> Crtl space brings up the code assistant, which allows you to browse through an alphabetical list of available commands.
> 
> I don’t believe that there is a command parameter pane that can be used with commands such as “OK Message”.
> 
> There are some performance optimizations for simpler commands such as “Calculate”.  Typing the letter “ca” (versus “c” in the list based editor) will display the insert “Calculate   as “ into the editor and set the cursor to just after the “Calculate”.  Once you type your variable or notation, you can press tab and the cursor will jump to after the “as” so that you can type a calculation.
> 
> This makes it easy to input simple commands, but when you get to commands that require multiple parameters such as an OK message it doesn’t work.  Also it seems that other commands lack keyboard optimizations that can benefit from this capability such as “For” which you have to start typing  “from” and “to” to complete the command and “Do” with which you have to start typing “returns” in order to return a value.
> 
> Another feature that I miss from the list base editor is selecting code.  I was a simple click and drag to select multiple lines of code and using the CTRL key I could select non contiguous lines.  In the text editor I have to ensue that if I am going to select multiple lines of code, the pointer must be at the beginning of the first line.  And to select the last line, I have to ensure that the pointer goes past the any comments at the end of the line.  There are ways of working around this using the keyboard, but I find the list based editor to be more productive.  
> 
> My intention with the emails about the editor is not to discourage the use of Studio 10 or to put down the amazing work that Omnis is done to make such an awesome product.  It’s just an opinion of my developer experience so far.  Perhaps in a future release many of the issues will that I have has will be addressed.  Ultimately there are many compelling reasons for upgrading to Studio 10.
> 
> Clientrax has been fortunate to have had early access to the DML to SQL interface in Studio 10 and we are excited about the possibility of migrating a large DML application to an SQL platform with minimal code changes.  This capability is a big driver for us to migrate from Studio 4.  Studio 10 is a great opportunity for developers with DML applications to add capabilities that clients/customers often ask for:  a robust SQL database and mobile/web capabilities.  The DML to SQL interface opens the door to this possibility.
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Feb 28, 2019, at 9:43 AM, Scotte Meredith <spomacguy at gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>> Hey, Thad —
>> 
>> I’ve not been able to start using Studio 10 yet for anything serious, but I went to the webinar yesterday that talked about the new feature.
>> 
>> I don’t remember the command, but Andreas showed a way to pop up a dialog box from which you could select these things. Might have been Ctrl-space. In this case he was showing the working message, which has all those odd parameters. Hit the key and up pops a familiar looking window with the options to select from. You can also configure how the variables get created based on your naming conventions, and change what keystrokes to use for each of the shortcuts by modifying the config.json file.
>> 
>> I expect we’ll be starting to use Studio 10 in the next few weeks.
>> 
>> Hope that helps.
>> 
>> 
>>> On Feb 28, 2019, at 6:26 AM, Thad Bogert <thad at technosolver.com> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hi All,
>>> 
>>> It the text editor I can also type “OK” and I can select “OK Message” in the code assistant and the following command will appear on the current line:
>>> 
>>> OK message
>>> 
>>> It is then up to me to type of the rest of the parameters and maintain the proper syntax.  Everything past the “OK message” in the example below I had to type:
>>> 
>>> OK message MyMessageTitle (Icon,Sound bell) {MY Message Text}
>>> 
>>> So if I want to display an icon and sound a bell I have to type: (Icon,Sound bell)
>>> 
>>> The message text also has to be wrapped in curly braces. {}
>>> 
>>> To help with the proper syntax for the current command, the editor displays the command syntax in a frame at the bottom of the editor. The following is an example:
>>> 
>>> OK message title ([Icon][,Sound bell][,cancel button]) {message}
>>> 
>>> Seeing the syntax does help but it requires you to move your eyes to two different parts of the screen.
>>> 
>>> The above example is an extreme case.  Some other commands such as “Calculate” are much easier to implement.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> I can understand the appeal of implementing a text editor like other mainstream development tools.  However to me the list based editor is something that sets Omnis apart.  When I initially started using Omnis (7.1.4), the categorized list of commands in the command palette helped me to quickly learn commands. And the command parameters pane helped me to quickly write code without having to know a lot of syntax.
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Scotte Meredith
>> SpoMacGuy at gmail.com
>> 
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Scotte Meredith
SpoMacGuy at gmail.com




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