NO: cultural diffs (UK version)

Mike Matthews omnis at lineal.co.uk
Tue Dec 28 08:10:54 EST 2010


We used to have one, it was thou or thee, as in Tu in French or Du in German or Eσύ in Greek (started learning this one in September, hard), but has fallen into disuse.  I always prefer the formal first contact, but in the UK that is very fast going the way of the Dodo.

Sometimes we use first name and surname, but most shop staff have name badges with just a first name, call centres annoy me as well, so a quick reminder is always in order.

But all of us lot are of course on first terms, we are all listers, brothers and sisters of the Omnis Temple, Happy New Year when it arrives around the globe to you all.

Mike Matthews
Managing Director 
Lineal Software Solutions Ltd

Past Authorised Apple Reseller,  Omnis Business Partner

Tel: 01271 850 550 

Email: mike.matthews at lineal.co.uk

Web: www.lineal.co.uk


On 28 Dec 2010, at 08:45, Fred Brinkman wrote:

> Especially in the French part of Belgium it is 'good manners' to not call everybody by the first name, staff will almost never call their 'bosses' by the first name, a bit like in Germany where politeness forbids this. It is considered not done...
> 
> In English you don't have a 'polite' form. it's always 'You', no matter who you're talking to. in most other languages there's a 'formal You' and a 'common You'. When I talk to people I don't know, or who are older than I am f.i. I always use the 'formal you'... matter of respect... I expect them to do the same...
> 
> Maybe this sounds old-fashioned to you but that's the way it is... it surely is no 'joke' or 'contempt' or 'suppressed anger', it's a respectful way of dealing with others.
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> Fred.
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> Fred Brinkman
> www.euromnis.com
> 
> **********************************************
> Fred Brinkman Consultancy
> B-1000 Brussels
> 
> Tel. +32-474-83 80 80
> Fax +32-2-330 10 31 (on request)
> Email fred.brinkman at euromnis.com
> *********************************************
> 
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> Op 28 dec 2010, om 09:20 heeft Olafur Gardarsson het volgende geschreven:
> 
>> Using title such as Mr. and last name is one way of being formal. What do
>> you consider formal? I should not let this annoy me. I guess it's touching
>> on ideas about economic and social classes. Touchy subject for many,
>> including me it seems.
>> 
>> Oli
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 2010/12/27 Fred Brinkman <fred.brinkman at euromnis.com>
>> 
>>> well. I live in Brussels... what do you call 'formal in communications'?
>>> not calling people by their first name?
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Fred Brinkman
>>> www.euromnis.com
>>> 
>>> **********************************************
>>> Fred Brinkman Consultancy
>>> B-1000 Brussels
>>> 
>>> Tel. +32-474-83 80 80
>>> Fax +32-2-330 10 31 (on request)
>>> Email fred.brinkman at euromnis.com
>>> *********************************************
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
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>>> 
>>> Op 27 dec 2010, om 22:45 heeft Olafur Gardarsson het volgende geschreven:
>>> 
>>> I have some Belgian customers that are annoying me no end. They insist
>>>> that
>>>> I be formal in all communications with them, even in email's. Is this
>>>> important in Belgium in general? I feel like I'm talking to a relic from
>>>> the
>>>> 19th century. Over here we dropped all formalities in address over half a
>>>> century ago. Now days it's considered either a joke or a way to show
>>>> contempt or a show of suppressed anger. What's the story in your country?
>>>> 
>>>> Oli
>>>> Iceland
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